• Reviews

    Review: Junk Mage by Elliot Cooper (2016)

    “It’s a gift, not a trade.” Or it wasn’t a sly trade anymore, anyway. I couldn’t handle his haunted look, as if I’d just given him everything and he wasn’t allowed to keep it.

    Junk Mage, Elliot Cooper

    Rating: ★★★½
    Genre: Science fiction, fantasy, romance
    Categories: M/M, cyborgs, wizards, technomancy, personhood arc

    Content Warnings: N/A

    Description: Quill, an emotionally immature but well-intentioned technomancer, crash-lands his spaceship on a remote planet and has to figure out how to repair his ship in order to leave. There he meets Hunter, an amnesiac cyborg, whose trust (or cooperation) he has to earn in order to get off the planet and to not lose his best shot at a new life.

  • Reviews

    Review: Peter Darling by Austin Chant (2017)

    “That’s the trick of growing up. Nothing stays the same.” Hook sounded oddly sympathetic. “You see the faults in everything. Including yourself.”

    Peter Darling, Austin Chant

    Rating: ★★★★★
    Genre: Fantasy, fairy tale, romance
    Categories: M/M, trans, enemies to lovers, fairy tale retelling

    Content Warnings (highlight to read): Deals with societal & familial transphobia. Some death & violence but not graphic.

    Description: A sumptuously gorgeous re-imagining of Peter Pan where the fairies are all the more strange and where Neverland—and your identity—is what you decide to make of it. Enemies-to-lovers Peter & Hook: if this is automatically selling point, great, you won’t be disappointed. If it makes you raise your eyebrows: trust me, the storytelling, characterization & development is so deftly woven that you also won’t be disappointed.

    “Ten years ago, Peter Pan left Neverland to grow up, leaving behind his adolescent dreams of boyhood and resigning himself to life as Wendy Darling. Growing up, however, has only made him realize how inescapable his identity as a man is.”

  • Reviews

    Review: Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner (1987)

    “Above him, the stars shone frosty and remote in the clear sky. They wouldn’t dare to twinkle at him, not in the position he was in.”

    Swordspoint, Ellen Kushner

    Rating: ★★★★★
    Genre: Fantasy, romantic (but not a romance)
    Categories: M/M, M/F, politics & intrigue, royalty and nobility, hidden identity, swords & swordplay

    Content Warnings (highlight to read): Frequent but not super graphic murder & violence. Recreational drug use. Discussions & ideation of suicide. Very morally ambiguous protagonists.

    Description: A “classic melodrama of manners” where disputes are settled with sharp blades and sharper tongues. Swordspoint follows an interweaving set of characters and perspectives in a struggle for political power in the world of Riverside: Richard St Vier, an excellent swordsman but not much for conversation; Alec, his sharp-tongued lover with bad habits and worse ideas; Michael Godwin, a young lord who finds himself involved in games over his head; an elegantly powerful Duchess; and the rest of an engaging and largely morally ambiguous cast.